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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
kaepernick was not based on smith's condition. and he tossed two touchdowns, compileed a 133 passer rating and earned good reviews from his teammates on monday against the bears. he will be under center on sunday. >>> we'll take a break. 4:23. we'll have more headlines in a moment. >>> let's talk some world news. after eight days of rocket attacks. game and hamas have agreed to a ceasefire. leaders helped broker the deal. here you see the secretary standing with egypt's president. whether it will end still remains to be scene. hamas has fired five times since it started. we have reaction from a demonstration. >> reporter: the about the kill palestinians. >> it has been going on for a while. they have been bombed to a ten times worse than it has been. it has been a struggle for them out there. we're protesting against that. >> reporter: they say the genocide is out of control. they believe the occupation is illegal. >> it is motivated by profit and consumes the lives of palestinians. i just got back there six months ago, it is terrible. >> reporter: and officers patrolled with the sea of p
have mcmc wee-wee we h have such a person. megyn: the daughter of anna nicole smith landing a modeling gig with the same agency her mother did. why they worry she may be on her same path. and we find out how governor ronald reagan dealt with the same type of situation. michael reagan is here. megyn: that was a beautiful shot of the front of fox news studios right here in negotiate. for children over in sweden this year christmas is all about gender neutrality. girls shooting guns, take a look at the pictures, boys coddling dolls. on the pages of sweden's toys r us catalogue. this after the swedish government accused the owners of toys r us there of tere kwroe typinstereotyping. in one catalogue they photo shopped one girl off of the hello kitty's page and changed another's from pink to blue. should toy companies be more gender neutral in their ads. this did not used to be an issue. remember this? issue. remember this? >> stretching fun further than ever before. he stretches, even ties in knots but always returns to his original shape. megyn: it was the best. that was my favorite toy ev
smith isaac granger. i studied him in great detail in a couple of cases he mentions that jefferson was a good master and that jefferson's son-in-law who ran things around here when jefferson was away, cornel raldolf was in charge he was an executive overseer. he was a good master. it in going through the record i found that he -- when he was strapped for cash, took isaac's daughter and sold him to overseer who took the young girl away to kentucky and she was never seen again. now, isaac didn't mention that in his memoir, why? i really don't know. maybe he told his white interviewer and the interviewer didn't want to write it down. maybe isaac didn't want to say anything that would hurt the feelings of a white man. maybe it didn't -- maybe it hasn't left my impression. we don't know. it's not there. it leads one to realize that there is a lot in these accounts that we really don't know, and that the psychology possible distortion that took place under slavery that we are still wrestling with. another person's memoir who i spent a lot of time with was peters to et. he left two memoir
in my life and a difference to so many people. mr. smith: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from florida, bill posey. mr. posey: thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate the opportunity to join with me colleagues in recognizing chairman ralph hall for his tenure as chairman of the house science committee. during his service, he reached acrong the -- across the aisle and forged bipartisan coalitions to support important legislation and no program, in my view, has benefited more if his bipartisan commitment than the united states space program. representative hall has been an especially strong voice for our nation's human space flight program which has benefited not only tbs and florida but propoled our nation on the path of unprecedented scientific and technological advancement. we can all learn a lot from our colleagues. congressman hall leads by example. he's well known for calling a spade a spade. his word truly is his bond and you can always take that to the bank. advancing our nation's human space flight program has been a hallmark for chairman hall. as we look out at america's
smith himself. on one hand he's blowing kisses at smith and on the other hand you see what he's really saying. >> when you are on top you can play these little games. if he was a winning people would say oh well he's indecisive. he has a team all messed up because he won't name a starter. when you are winning some of that is just a look it me look in may. the best that he put and there is that the league instructed him to. because the gamblers want to know. >> he wants to keep them guessing. the latest thing i read i said you know what he can do anything even play them both. let's do a jet set here. that is brilliant ! >> you understand i'm saying when you're winning you are a genius. when you're not winning all the things he is doing keeping the team in the dark and upsetting both of them back and forth. he is the most compelling bay area sports figure. people love the forty-niners. by wednesday it will be a cap rack and that will be the end of it. -- collin kaepernick >> i say this is kind of mean to alex smith to do it this way. just say it. >> i am sure alex smith knows. i emphasiz
of treatment available. the gene was passed along through abigail's family, she was born abigail smith and her brother died of alcoholism. >> he mentioned one line of. do we know much about him? >> he abandoned his family, right? he disappeared? >> he died of alcoholism. you died very early but of some accident because you were out of control or of sclerosis of the liver or brain damage or alcoholism. john quincy adams two brothers died of a alcoholism and two of john quincy adams three sons died of dhaka was some from his firstborn george washington adams died in his late 20s and as a young boy charles also died of it and one of the three songs survived as did several of the grandson's but this was a genetic trait in the smith family. just as in the quincy family, the genius which went back to 1066 and the crossing of the battle of hastings by all will dillinger town in normandy that still looks this and the english obviously corrected -- corrupted he was a baron running mate in 2015 that forced king john to sign the magna tara so this ran through the currency as well as alcoholism and for th
jarrett in for shepard smith. more than 24 hours later, the cease-fire in the middle east is still holding. [horns and sirens] >> hamas military tans celebrating claiming they changed the game by avoiding an israeli invasion of gaza. israelis say they won by ending the hamas rocket attacks and weakening the militant group. each side is also mourning tonight in gaza city a funeral for a man killed in israeli air strike just before the cease-fire took effect. and the israeli military reporting a soldier died today after a rocket attack that also happened before the cease-fire. the second israeli soldier killed in the conflict. conor powell joins us live in jerusalem. connor, are things almost back to normal there in israel? >> well, greg, there are still a lot of tension. there is still a lot of fear here in israel. we are now entering the second day of this cease-fire and with each passing hour there really does seem to be the belief that this cease-fire may actually take hold so, yes, things are beginning to return to normal. shops and markets are beginning it reopen. particularly in south
nicole smith's little girl is modeling for the clothing brand guess just like her mother did. we'll have more on that story. >>> we're also going to tell you about a recent health scare for oprah winfrey. >> we want to begin with cyber monday, big success. diana alvear is live from phoenix at the amazon.com fulfillment center. good morning to you. >> reporter: lots of happy faces on the floor this morning. now that it's clear the consumers were out in full force, shopping with their laptops, their devices, turning amaz amazon.com into their top online destination. whether you were shopping from home or on the go, cyber monday seems to have been a monster success. >> we should see somewhere around $1.5 billion of spending by consumers online. >> reporter: game-changer this year, smartphones, tablets and other devices. ibm's research estimates the number of shoppers using mobile devices on cyber monday grew more than 20% over last year. that very convenience could cost brick and mortar retailers. it's called showrooming. consumers look at products they want, perhaps even test them out, all
influential idea of adam smith that markets would read to the efficiency of the economy. and ken arrow was the person who actually proved, the circumstances under which it was correct. so anybody who talked about the wonders of the free market, he was the one who actually showed that adam smith was right. but in showing he was right, he also understood that it was only right under very restricted conditions, and the healthcare sector was one condition in which it was never right, and similar to my own work on economics of asymmetric information -- >> core understanding. >> what it showed is the reasonable the invisible hand seems invisible is that it's not there. and this gesture is a real case on point. >> just to add, all abstract reasoning, but thenk at reality and it's overwhelming. the -- looking across countries can the united states has the most market oriented healthcare system and the most expensive without getting better results. >> we're ranked 37th in the world in the world health organization in terms of quality. >> within the united states, although medicare is very expen
out to hank smith, chief investment officer. hank, good more thning. are you surprised there is no more optimism in futures? >> no, not really. because here in the united states, it's all about the fiscal cliff and very interesting last week as congress was on recess on vacation, the markets were you up. you now that congress is back in seg, there's a lot of jitteriness and i think you'll continue to see this until there is a resolution at least until we see that the fiscal cliff is being averted, either with a bridge or something more comprehensive and permanent, which is highly doubtful in a lame duck congress. >> for example the durable goods orders, we've seen a fall off in investment. is that owed to this uncertainty over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. capital spending is on strike here in the united states and has been for a while. but the good news is 2013 should be the year that certainty replaces uncertainty. unleashing a lot of pept up demand. so we can make the case that we'll see an acceleration of gdp growth with this unleashing of pent up demand in 2013.
're not the old fashioned filibuster people remember from "mr. smith goes to washington" when senator smith stood at a desk probably about there in their mockup of the senate floor and talked himself exhausted reading from the baseball, reading from the constitution, he might have even read from the dictionary. i remember there was an old reporter up in the press gallery speaking about this and he talked about it being one of the great examples of american democracy, one lone senator able to speak until he's exhausted on pint that matters to him. people may have been frustrated by that kind of filibuster but there was at least a kind of noblity to it. the filibuster of today is very different. it's a threat from the minority party to bombard something with amendments so that it can't be managed on the floor. it's a threat to filibuster, to which the majority leader has to respond by filing cloture, and when the majority leader is forced to file cloture, the minority gets a benefit. they get 30 hours of debate. and, of course, as we've seen in the senate that 30 hours of debate is never used. it j
in the mile of nowhere, believe me. i'll send you the books. and warren smith from florida, bill miller was right and you were wrong. general petraeus is now a civilian and has nothing to do with the military code of justice. love this, i live for this. i live for this. you, warren, and the d man are both wrong! since general petraeus is on the books with a very big pension, he is under the military code. look it up. he had to resign after admitting to the affair. if you are getting any money from the military, pensions, anything like that, you are under their code. finally tonight, "the factor" tip of the day. this goes back to the talking points memo about the entitlement society. americans wanting stuff. you've got to teach your kids, teach them to be self reliant. they're not born that way. so here is the tip, if you have a child or grandchild ten years and older, open a bank account for them. give them some cash for the holidays. that is the positive in said account. they will get a statement every month in the mail. they might get a checkbook. believe me, they will pay attention a
of this in politics. we like to think we do. it was memorialized by frank capra. mr. smith talks for 24 hours in that one. filibusters rarely last as long as that. huey long talked for 15 hours once. 22 hours and 26 minutes over an oil bill. a few years later, senator thurman spent 24 hours and 18 minutes up there defending white southerners. you need 60 votes to stop it. you need 60 votes to shut it down. until you got those votes, whoever was in the minority just kept talking. no voting, i'm still talking and you can't stop me. nighty night. we know about the old examples because a filibuster used to happen so rarely because when it did happen the public noticed. now it's not even a filibuster. these days any senator can block any piece of legislation by raising a hand and saying so. a senator can block legislation without even paying the cause of anybody noticing and having the constituents back home asking why they are holding the floor to make some big point. with the filibuster now being so comparatively cheap to come by, it's become unusually plentiful in washington. the modern senate
smith. this is the fox report. it's the bottom of the hour. time for the top of the news and five weeks from today, pretty much everybody's taxes go up unless president obama and congress can keep us from going over that ever talked about fiscal cliff. now the white house says president obama is taking his case to the people. meeting with small business leaders. today middle class families, tomorrow in hitting the road for a campaign style rally on friday. gop leaders say he should stay in dc and try to work out a deal. house republicans say they're also planning to get out of washington and hold events from small businesses back home. james rosen live at the white house tonight. do we know whether the talks have broken down? >> the white house says no, shep, that the work continues between key staff aides on both sides. but there is for this week as yet no follow-up session planned for negotiations like the one that the president held in the roosevelt room earlier this month with all four leaders from the house and senate. democrats more thanked from that session back on november 16 ta
are connecting from all over the world for all sorts of reasons. in chicago, dawn smith wanted to improve her job skills with a free course in pharmacology from the university of pennsylvania. she loved the convenience, the quality, and the cost. >> about another 19 years of payments on my master's degree so i didn't want to necessarily add to the cost of that. which was a big factor. >> some point out that the immersive experience of attending college can hardly be replicated by loggingon to a laptop and the contact with professors hugely limited online. but this trend could open up education to hundreds of millions of people. >> i've already taught more students than i could have ever hoped to teach in my entire career. >> reporter: and there's still a lot to learn. tom foreman, cnn, baltimore. >> that does it for this edition of "360." thank you for watching. "erin burnett outfront starts now." > outfront next, with the fiscal cliff just 35 days away, congressional loerds say president obama isn't doing enough to make a deal. senator mark warner, the third wealthiest man of the senate, outfron
ers are still waiting for word on whether alex smith is going to get medical clearance following his concussion two weeks ago. some news organizations are reporting that collin has been picked as the starter because he had the terrific game against the chicago bears on monday night. >>> time is 8:39, a middle east leader who's been praised as a peacemaker is accused of a bold power play in his own country. >>> and more trouble for comedian cat williams, the lawsuit he's facing following his on stage melt down in oakland. or >>> welcome back to morning's on 2. here's a live look at your big board, market open for an hour left today. traders encouraged by powerful economic tuesday from germany and china to engines of global growth. and watching shopping today, hoping it shows momentum in the economic recovery. >>> our time is 8:43 let's bring you up to date on some of the other top stories. we've been talking about this for a couple of hours now. three lanes are shut down on highway 101 in palo alto. there's been a they fall collision involving a chp -- there has been a fatal collision
this morning i asked morgan stanley smith barney director ron hart if there were any benefits of actually going over. >> getting our fiscal house in order, either now or later, right? we can't spend money at this trajectory, 16 trillion in debt. 99 trillion nun funded liabilities with medicare and social security, so at some point you've either got to do it now or do it later. >> congress is back in session on monday and expectsed to work on a solution. >>> and in europe, european union leaders aend two dye days of divisive budget talks without a deal. they are caught for one plan to increase the budget and another to cut t.eu leaders should be able to reach a deal early next year. >>> number four, take a look at this. not sure what all the letters and numbers mean. neither do top british spy agencies. it's apparently some sort of world war ii code that was found on the skeleton of a carrier pigeon found in a man's chimney in england. this is pretty fascinating stuff. according to the uk intelligence agency, 250,000 pigeons were used during world war ii by all branches of the military and the s
. the next inductee will get $500 million payout. that's the net worth of will smith, britney spears, and jennifer aniston combined. with $500 million, you can knock on oprah's california home, tell her you want to buy five of them, and have $75 million to spare. but the luckiest people of all, are those who, years later, haven't managed to go broke. >> been married 41 years. i know what to do with this check. >> reporter: people like jim and carolyn mccullar, who had a ticket worth $190 million. >> my kids, my grandkid, my great grandkids and their children also. we're not going to blow this. >> reporter: now, almost two years later, they've managed to do just what they said. they've set up trust funds for their 4 kids and 23 grandchildren, been very generous with donations. and most importantly, haven't blown their millions. and cynthia stafford, who won $112 million hasn't, either. >> it's a blessing. and people who receive it that way, they tend to keep it. i'm involved with a number of organizations. and it just warms my heart to be able to do these things. >> reporter: she's us
was going to make them weather was an eric said right or a howard k. smith, the people that ed murrell hired for people of substance, historians. writers. leaders, people who cared about history. and sometimes when i look at what passes for news on cable television, especially these days, i don't know where they find these people. [laughter] >> he cared a great deal about writing. one of the point you're making earlier about some things that you wanted to last for three, four, five days before it would actually get on the air, it had to be written, and written well. merl cared a great deal about style and the way in which you presented information. it was always for me -- >> interesting. and is going to interrupt you for a second. take a look at how awesome, when you're watching something being covered on cable television these days, and it requires great skill. i'm not denigrating it in any fashion, but notice how often was your hearing is just whatever comes off the top of the head of a man or woman who is reporting. take note of how rare it is for a script actually to be written. now, you
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)